The Prince And The Dragon

Standard

Just a parenthesis from my journey through the story world of HCA, I wanted to share this quick insight about one of my favourite topics: Dragons.

From Volksmarehen der Serben this story is a classic tale where the dragon is the animalization of evil and humans are the righteousness.  From The Crimson Fairy Book, edited by Andrew Lang, this story tells about how the youngest and also the wisest prince confronts the evil dragon in order to save his imprudent brothers.

The main character – the young prince – is (again) a person with no defects.  He is clever, humble and strong at the same time.

   Because of this, he triumphed over the same test that his brothers scummed to by not choosing the easy path.  He also uses wit as well as strength to over come his enemy and ultimately recover his brothers.

He thinks ahead and before setting off to his task and provides himself with what he will need when the time came to face up to the challenge.  He studies the best way to get to his opponent and with no problems he disguises himself as a servant rather than receive what should be given to him by his status.

The brothers are the typical people who go first to whatever is labour-saving.  Instead of considering that the their easy pray is perhaps a trap, they just lunge towards it in the hopes of achieving their goal with the least effort and of course we all know what happens.

The dragon on the other hand represents all that is evil like most mid-evil stories.  He is strong, intelligent and full of malice but he is also proud and conceited, for he bends to praise and flattery.  This in the end makes him vulnerable and is defeated.  Here one can see the representation of people who rely on their sole strength and boast of their virtues.  In a word, the typical “egotistical” person.

This story helps us to consider how we should confront the difficulties that we are presented in our daily lives.  Strength is not the only thing that is needed to triumph in life but the story doesn’t say that this element is not important.  Everything counts wit, humility and prudence as well as strength.

http://www.rickwalton.com/folktale/crimsn08.htm (the link for the full story)


Advertisements

About María Gómez de la Torre

I'm a school teacher and I'm also a storyteller. I enjoy reading new children stories and commenting about them. I specially love dragon tales and stories about fairies. I love people commenting on my thoughts so please feel free to do so - as long as it's positive ;o)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s